Monday, June 16, 2014

Glowing Bowling Math!

While surfing Pinterest I discovered a pin for glow in the dark bowling.  Knowing our daughters enthusiasm for bowling, I quickly thought of a way to use this idea as a tool to enhance their math skills.

What You Will Need
Water Bottles
Glow in the Dark Sticks
A Ball
Math Sheets


For our game we used six empty water bottles. We started off with water still in the bottles; however our ball was not hard enough to knock over the "pins". You can use as many bottles as your family can knock over.  The girls had to record the number of pins they knocked over with each roll on their math sheet to create a number sentence. Writing their score added to their excitement of playing the game. 

For our daughter entering kindergarten I used simple addition sentence facts. For our daughter entering 2nd grade we reviewed common core 1st grade math by making a "tens" and "ones" block. For example: If the child knocks over 3 pins, then they write 30 in the tens section. On the next roll if they knock over 4 pins, then they write 4 in the ones section, 30+4= 34. Plus, I added three multiple addition number sentences.

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Summer Time Craft: Homemade Suncatcher Paint

Making your own colorful paint:

Jennifer Wieland is a true blessing in our crafty household with her blog My Sweet Sanity! She discovered a perfect technique that cut the cost of both of my daughter's favorite craft  project of painting suncatchers. Her solution, make it yourself! My girls LOVE color, and would use every drop of paint in one painting session. Plus, there would always be that one color that would run out before all the rest. With this gem, in just a snap, you can always stir-up another batch of that beloved color.

It is simple, cheap, and the colors are more vibrant than the store bought paints. The cherry on top is the little painters can make their own colors by mixing primary colors together. Mixing the colors was a funny learning experience for my soon-to-be Kindergartner. 

What you will need:
Clear Glue
Food Coloring
Small Containers or cups to hold the paint
Plastic Suncatchers
Section-cup hangers or string to hang the Suncatcher
toothpicks to stir

Squeeze desired amount of glue for your group into your containers. I happened to have some old dried out paints that I had bought. I cleaned out the little cups and reused them to make our own paints. For our containers, I used two drops of food coloring. To create other colors, we put one drop of each primary color we needed to make orange, purple, and blue-green. Use the toothpicks to stir the food coloring into the clear glue. Mix well. 

         Once your paints are mix together let your painter create their masterpiece!

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Blueberries: Float, Sink, or Dance

Today we went on an adventure to our local U-Pick blueberry farm. We started our journey at story-time on the farm.
Then off we went to pick fresh plumb blueberries.

Once at home, we placed three clear cups onto our experiment tray. One cup we filled with water, the second vinegar and the third Club Soda. We took three blueberries and placed them in the freezer to use later. With fresh berries in-hand, we tested our theory if a blueberry would: float, sink, or dance in the liquid. I told the girls which liquid we were placing the berry in, and each girl had to call out their theory. It was exciting to see if the girls would pick the same or different answer.  Then we added some kick by adding baking soda in the water and vinegar cups. The results were interesting.I could tell them to you, but that would take away the suspense of you conducting this experiment with your little ones. I will say this, let them sit in the cups and you will see some dancing blueberries!

We retested the experiment with the frozen berries to see if we would have the same reaction as the fresh ones. We discussed how a berry is filled with water and juice. We covered the fact that water and juice will freeze, just like water can freeze into ice-cubes.

After our experiment was complete the girls wrote in their journals. The math portion will be introduced as we make a delicious blueberry treat!

 What you will need:
3 clear cups
Baking Soda
Club Soda

Have a berry time!

Erupting into Summer Jello Style!

This Summer we will be challenging our creative juices and exploring our imagination. Our little ones are like dry sponges, thirty to absorb knowledge!  The goal is to perform an experiment or craft each week day that will enhance their math, writing, reading, and science skills. 

We started the Summer off with "Erupting Jello". This is an experiment that I discovered on Pinterest

What you will need:
Two Colors of instant Jello mix
Baking Soda  
A tray
2 clear cups/bowls
A spoon

Place 1 1/2 to 2 tsp of sodium bicarbonate, baking soda, into the clear cups. Then add 1/2 of the package of Jello. Take this time to talk to the little ones about fractions. We discussed that the package was a whole and how we had to split the whole into equal halves. Before going further, discuss a hypothesis of what will occur once you add acid of the vinegar to the sodium bicarbonate. We also examined the light color of the jello powder. The girls came up with the theory of the powder reacting to the liquid enhancing the brightness of the lime and red. 
 Then it was time to erupt! The girls add the vinegar to the powders.  We placed about 4oz of vinegar into each cup.
 The girls theory of the color changing was correct and so was our hypothesis. We took this time to discover the reaction the acid had to the sodium that would have a cause and effect to erupt. This is a wonderful experiment for all ages! Seeing we are a melting pot of school age children, I have attached an informative link to that gives 5 reasons for the reaction.  
 The girls had a great time watching the colors erupt into each other. By using a spoon they were able to create designs by blending the colors into swirls. Then using their hands they created a brownish color by mixing one big mess. The girls have a science journal to log their experiments to enhance their writing.